UK
FR
ES
IT
DE
RU
CH
JP
KR
BR
> World Heritage
> Traces of history
> Architectural treasure
> Ongoing expansions
> Environment
> Visit the city
> Wine tours & tastings
> Festivals & events
> Accommodation
> Restaurants
Print
The Grand Théâtre, quarter of Grands Hommes
ARCHITECTURAL
TREASURE
QUARTER OF
GRANDS
HOMMES
QUARTER OF
CITY HALL
THE FACADE OF
THE QUAYS
THE JARDIN
PUBLIC
CHARTRONS
& MERCHANTS
WINE IN THE CITY
At the end of the XVIIIth century, The city of Bordeaux was particularly lively thanks to it commercial activities (wine, colonial trade...)..
 
The Duke of Richelieu, Governor of Guyenne, decided to equip the city with an Opera House that was fitting of such a city, and asked the architect Victor Louis (1731-1800) to oversee the project.
 
Started in 1773, the construction of the Grand-Théâtre took seven years to complete, and was finished in 1780. This imposing neoclassical building (88 x 47 metres) is capable of holding 1,114 people.
 
he Grand-Thêatre underwent a final restoration during 1990-1991, recreating the original decoration. Today the Grand Théâtre is unarguably one of the finest pieces of this city that is so marked by XVIIIth century architecture.

The concert hall was built by Charles Burguet between 1865 and 1870. It features painted and gold wooden panelling and ceilings developed over around 1,800 m2 of total surface area with oil-painted glued canvases.

The Grand-Thêatre presents both theatrical and musical productions, and has seen some of the finest stars of the last century: the Talma, Nourrit,Viardot, Falcon, Duprez, Petipa...
 
The Grand-Théâtre still offers musicals, ballet and concerts... and is true to its vocation today, more than ever.

Find out more
Elisabeth MITTON
 
QUARTER OF GRANDS HOMMES
 
The "Grands Hommes" is known to the people of Bordeaux as "the Triangle", the formed by the Allées de Tourny, cours Clemenceau and cours de l’Intendance. It was built during the period of the revolution.
 

In 1789, the area was made up of convents: the Récollets and the Jacobins whose church, Saint-Dominique (Notre Dame since the Concordat) was built by Duplessy-Michel (1684-1707).
 
Bordeaux faced the revolution with relative serenity, and after the requisition of the clergy's belongings, found itself with vast tracts of vacant land that were used to remodel the quarter.
 
At that time, in July 1790, architects such as Laclotte, Bonfin and Lhôte made proposals for projects, although none of them were selected. However, the architect Chalifour who proposed a compilation, undertook the works: a circular central square with radiating streets. The works (sales, demolition of exiting convent buildings, creation of streets) started around 1792, were quickly stopped due to the Terror (1793-94) and did not start again until 1797.

At the same time, the Sainte-Geneviève Church in Paris became the Panthéon des Grands Hommes. In Bordeaux, the great minds responsible for the Revolution were (Montesquieu, Rousseau, Voltaire).
 
Very few monuments were built during this period: The Hôtel Meyer, built in 1796 for the Consul of Hamburg, and the Théâtre Français (1800) by Dufart.
Elisabeth MITTON